Op the rigging

THE LAST GRAIN RACE, by Eric Newby, published in 1956

Bookcase 10, shelf 9, book 3

What a winner, getting this – one of my all-time favourite travel books. One of my all-time favourite books, in fact. And in this case I am including the actual, physical book in my remark, because this is a first edition I found several years ago at a book fair when I was on holiday on the north Norfolk coast. It replaced a Picador paperback which had been read so often that it fell apart (not always that difficult with some of those white-spined Picador titles, mind).

I remember once hearing The Last Grain Race being discussed on Radio 4, and somebody dismissed it as ‘very much a bloke’s book’. Rubbish. I am most definitely not a bloke, and I adore it, so perhaps I should explain why instead of simply repeating the fact that it’s a wonderful read.

A large part of its appeal is down to Eric Newby’s attitude and the sheer style and class of his writing, writing which is never over the top or remotely purple, writing which nonetheless conveys the wonder of the world, whether that is rounding Cape Horn on one of the last grain clippers here, hiding from Nazis in Italy (Love and War in the Appenines) or trekking through Nuristan with a maniac friend (A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush). Lest anyone who doesn’t know Eric Newby assume he was a cross between James Bond and Richard Hannay, I’ll add that he is equally evocative describing his youth in Barnes or his work in the post-war rag trade (Something Wholesale). And of course he is also self-depreciating (the classic anecdote is one from Hindu Kush, where he and his companion encounter that legendary traveller Wilfrid Thesiger. They blew up their inflatable matresses at night, getting a predictable reaction from the Great Man: ‘God, you must be a couple of pansies’…) and immensely funny.

The Last Grain Race is the story of his voyage around the world as a young apprentice on board Moshulu, one of the last of the great windjammers, in 1938-9.

(Moshulu, incidentally, has a brief role in Godfather II, where she carries the young Vito Corleone to America – watch out for it, as it gives an idea of the scale of these huge but lightly crewed grain ships.)

Newby had always been tempted by the sea and finally gave in to romanticism, bad influences (Mountstewart, an elderly friend and possibly certifiable lunatic), heredity (his father ‘had once tried to run away to sea and been brought back from Millwall in a hackney cab’) and the growing realisation that this was an opportunity which was about to disappear from the oceans of the world for ever. He kept a meticulous record during the voyage, as well as writing letters and taking many remarkable photographs, all of which enabled him to write Grain Race so evocatively nearly 20 years later.

After a laborious attempt to locate a caribou-skin sleeping bag – ‘it took up a great deal of time which I could have spent more profitably in eating’ – which he had become convinced was necessary (the salesman: ‘The last one gave the man who slept in it anthrax’), and lugging the second-hand Louis Vuitton trunk found in a lost property shop, Newby set off for Belfast, Moshulu and – eventually – the Southern Ocean. All in all, for a voyage of some 30,000 miles.

The ship finally left the unappealing docks of pre-war Belfast on 18 October, and EN began a steep learning curve in everything from getting on with his variously eccentric shipmates to climbing the rigging in all situations (above a dock, in a storm, when someone is throwing up on your head), to what happens if you lose a hammer over the side and how bad a dead dog smells when you excavate it from the ballast four months after the Belfast stevedores have amusingly placed it there.

There is a lot of detail about the organization of a sailing ship, but it can easily be skipped; in fact, Newby tells readers where to jump to at one point if they don’t want to follow his ‘technical interlude’. Even without reading that, though, you inevitably pick up a lot of vicarious knowledge – how slippery the ratlines could be, and how dangerous; how to clean the revolting heads; how to set a course in Swedish, the working language of the ship.

And so the outward journey to Australia continues, Moshulu crossing the equator (with a horrible initiation ceremony for those who had not done so before, including EN) about a month after sailing.There is some wonderful writing about the sea, evocative in the extreme:

‘On Christmas morning the weather was cold and brilliant. Big following seas were charging up astern in endless succession. They surged beneath the ship, bearing her up, filling the air with whistling spray as their great heads tore out from under and ahead to leave her in a trough as black and polished as basalt except where, under the stern post, the angle of the rudder made the water bubble jade-green, as from a spring. From the mizzen yardarm, where I hung festooned with photographic apparatus, I could see the whole midships…’

Now is the time to mention the photographs – the extraordinary photographs. They are so good, and so comparatively rare, documenting life on a windjammer, that at least one commentator has described them as the most important aspect of Eric Newby’s work. They are indeed excellent, and in my edition are reproduced particularly well. In fact a book entirely devoted to them was published in 1999 – Learning the Ropes.

The ship arrived in Australia in early January, loaded and left in March 1939, and arrived back at Queenstown (now Cobh) in June, 91 days out. Moshulu was the winner of the ’39 grain race. But this was just before the outbreak of war and everything was to change, and change extremely fast, just as EN had anticipated. One of the other ships in the race, the Olivebank, hit a German mine in early September, but Moshulu herself survived, and is now – wait for it – a floating restaurant. And occasional film location.

Throughout The Last Grain Race, as with his other books, Eric Newby’s essentially genial and humane personality comes through. Yes, he’s a romantic, but he finds that characteristic amusing and gently pokes fun at his younger self (as in the affair of the wretched sleeping bag). He genuinely likes people and finds them interesting – and that’s not something you can say for every travel writer, or indeed every writer. There’s no need to explain away undesirable attitudes as being ‘common at the time’ or ‘simply reflecting the times in which the book was written’ because there aren’t any such attitudes in evidence. Having met the man himself when I was a baby bookseller, I can testify to his genuine niceness – an often under-esteemed quality.

A wonderful book, and a wonderful author.

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23 thoughts on “Op the rigging

    1. Kate Post author

      It’s fab (really), and I should have issued a snorting with laughter warning too… the first time I read it I ended up laughing so much tea came down my nose. Lovely. Enjoy!

      Reply
  1. David Hirzel

    Those who enjoyed Newby’s book might also like “Windjamming to China” by Gustav Tjgaard (available through your local bookseller or Amazon). Tjgaard went to sea as a boy of sixteen on the five-masted schooner “Vigilant” hauling timber from Seattle to China in 1938, and was at sea the same time as Newby.

    Tjaard’s book came out last year. He is one of the last living representatives of that dying breed, the seafarer during the last great days of commerce under sail. His book is charmingly written from the vantage of an eighty-year old man recalling his first voyage under sail, and it has everything in it: danger, hard work, bucko mates–his captain made an appearance in the “Red Record”–bad food, life ashore in sailortown. It also is a veritable encyclopedia of maritme history and shiphandling,

    David Hirzel
    http://www.antarctic-discovery.com

    Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      Oh, please do. I’m not sure if the diagrams in the paperback / current editions are as good, though – I honestly can’t remember.

      Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      HIs photographs are fantastic. Especially when you realise that at one point his camera got soaked and he had to try and reassemble the shutter… agh….

      Reply
  2. Jonathan Caswell

    Just an additional thought: my poetry partner, Ron Dubour, at ourpoetrycorner.wordpress.com, does great historical figure poetry. You should look at some of his and perhaps work together on a few. I’ll mention it to him.

    Reply
  3. combs2jc

    Ok … I am goin’ huntin’ for this book. I love the sea and always have. My parents say I told them when I was 5 I was going to sea, and I did for about 9 years. I already know what books I will keep this between on my shelf (when I am not reading it). Thank you very much, great article.

    Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      I hope you find it, you’d love it. I now live near to the sea – I can see (sorry) it from the house – but when I lived in the middle of London this book had a terrible effect on me. I’ve I could have run away to sea in the 1930s, I’d have done it (might have had to change sex first, but hey).

      Reply
  4. timberbookshelves

    I feel that I have to get that book. Not yours, of course, but one just as good. The end of an era indeed. I have a 1836 map for schools and it encourages all the lads to go to sea and partake in expanding both the empire and the then known world. Africa at that time was an outline with one river for example. Looking forward to it. Glad I found this on FP (congrats btw).

    Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      Thanks for the congrats, and you definitely need to get hold of Grain Race – sounds right up your street!

      (Wow on 1836 Africa – things like that bring home to you how much the world has changed in comparatively short time.)

      Reply

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